Ebook – Study Conclusions

Ebook – Study Conclusions

Ebook – Study Conclusions

Key Results Presentation

 AIDGLOBAL provides the conclusions of the Study carried out under the GVETS project and contained in the document “Ebook”.

  1. There are no explicit and holistic policies regarding the integration of migrant children in any of the countries where the study was conducted.In 2017, the European Commission proposed a set of 10 principles for integrating child protection systems, providing a framework for the care of minors in the matter of migration, but each Member State is responsible for its national agreements. Small migrants are generally considered as part of the family unit and are ignored both in terms of available services and their needs.
  2. A more systemic and holistic approach to the support and training of professionals working with migrant children is needed. It is essential to develop integrated training strategies, including improving the quality of education resources and new training methodologies for professionals working in this field.
  3. Empirical research has shown that there are good examples of organized training for professionals working with migrant children in EU countries. However, the problem is that they are usually project-based (arise from projects) and their continuity is uncertain after their funding ends. This applies to both “old” and “new” EU Member States. This funding mechanism does not allow the creation of a clear network of training actions, and no clear and stable network has been identified in any country in which the research was conducted.
  4. Experts and participants in the online survey unequivocally supported the on-site training on migration issues rather than e-learning and considered the on-site training to be the most appropriate for migration issues. The use of ICT is seen as an auxiliary tool to enrich supply, but not as a substitute for face-to-face enablement.
  5. Professionals would like to receive training in relational / soft skills, such as communication skills, conflict and problem solving, intercultural sensitivity and knowledge, identification of child needs and more practical skills as non-formal education methods and techniques. , integration into local community practices and tools. In addition, self-care training was mentioned as important, highlighting the need for resilience, self-awareness / reflectivity.
  6. Professionals are willing to participate in training activities using gamification and ICT to acquire and develop skills. However, it is important to remember that not all professionals have the level of computer skills required to follow online training. Other important prerequisites are easy and continuous access to technologies and a generally favorable / positive environment for their use.
  7. The gamification process must be rigorous and almost personalized to end users. The end user must be clearly identified, the content and instructions must be easy and clearly related to the objective reality. Only then will it be possible to provide training with concrete goals and objectives.
  8. An important issue that could be addressed with ICT tools is the possibility of creating differentiated networks for different professional areas. There is currently no such possibility, despite strong demand from specialists located in institutions, regions and localities.
  9. Another relevant aspect that could be considered, at least in part, has to do with ICT tools and gamification – the possibility of self-care or at least self-assessment in terms of the mental status of professionals working with migrant children. in order to detect burnouts (burnout associated with professional activity). The need for training related to self-awareness / reflectivity was pointed out as one of the skills that need training.

To see the full document, click here.

Financiado pela Comissão Europeia através do programa Erasmus+, o GVETS envolve 7 Organizações de 7 países da União Europeia: AIDGLOBAL, de Portugal; IASIS, da Grécia; OXFAM, de Itália; ITAINNOVA, de Espanha; Grupo de Desenvolvimento de Diversidade, da Lituânia; Centro de Inovação Social, de Chipre; e Menedék, a associação coordenadora, da Hungria.